Asian Para Games: Gawilan gets 2nd gold, Ancheta wins weightlifting bronze

first_imgErnie Gawilan and Adeline Ancheta-Dumapong boosted the Philippines’ medal haul in 2018 Para Games held in Jakarta, Indonesia.ADVERTISEMENT Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Gawilan, who won the country’s first gold medal in the multisport competition, added another gold to his name after ruling the men’s 100-meter backstroke S7 category Wednesday evening at GBK Aquatic Center.Gawilan clocked in at 1:19.90 and he shared the top spot with Japan’s Daisuke Ejima.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissIn the women’s powerlifting, Ancheta-Dumapong took the bronze medal in the women’s over 86.00-kilogram category Thursday at Balai Sudirman.Ancheta-Dumapong’s best lift was at 107 kilograms, which was good enough to put her in the podium. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award LATEST STORIES Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Republic of Korea’s Lee Hyungjung won the gold after the best lift of 118 kilograms while Indonesia’s Sriyanti Sriyanti took the silver with a best lift of also 118 kilograms.Lee took home the top prize after as she lifted 115 kilograms in the first attempts, a kilogram heavier than what Sriyanti did.The Philippines is tied with Hongkong at the 10th spot of the medal tally with six gold medals apiece.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown New dads Jio Jalalon, Paul Lee draw inspiration from first-borns Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READlast_img read more

GWMA to create app to report crimes

first_imgThe Guyana Women Miners Association (GWMA) is moving towards the use of technology as it seeks to improve and expand its services.President of the Guyana Women Miners Association, Urica PrimusThe Department of Public Information has reported that GWMA President Urica Primus told a mining consultation recently that the organisation is in the process of developing an app that will allow individuals to report mining violations and criminal activities.The GWMA will, in August, also be buying two drones for mapping. According to Primus, the organisation has already met with the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission (GGMC) to identify areas that are under threat.“While we have been providing information to all the relevant ministries, we believe that there is still a lot more taking place under cover, and still a lot more than we can learn from,” she said.The organisation has been involved in training in matters of taxation, and has hired two accounting firms to assist members in the rural communities to become tax compliant. Primus said the GWMA has also been lobbying the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA) to take its services to rural communities.last_img read more

Fruit vendor busted with 5.8 kg ganja

first_imgA 37-year-old fruit vendor was in the wee hours of Tuesday morning nabbed by Police with 5.8 kilograms (13 lbs) of cannabis at his North Ruimveldt, Georgetown home.Reports are Police acting on information swooped down on the house andSome of the ganja that was found at a North Ruimveldt, Georgetown home on Tuesdayconducted a search during which the illegal substance was unearthed.According to information reaching Guyana Times, several parcels of the illegal drug was found hidden in a microwave while another quantity was found buried in the backyard. The vendor was taken into Police custody and is being processed for court.last_img

Taxes are the largest expense for Canadian households: Study

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fraser Institute is out with a new study that has found taxes, and not basic necessities like food, clothing, and housing, make up the largest expense for the average Canadian household.It found the average family paid $34,154 in taxes of all sorts last year, including what it calls “hidden” business taxes passed along in the price of goods and services purchased.The conservative think tank says last year the average family bill for income taxes collected by governments was $10,616.- Advertisement -It puts the second-biggest category, payroll and health taxes, at $7,160 dollars, and it is followed by sales taxes at $4,973, and property taxes at $3,832.The study’s authors conclude that visible and hidden taxes would have been equal to 42.4% of the cash income for an average Canadian family in 2015, estimated at $80,593.By comparison, that’s nearly five percent more than the average family paid, for food, clothing, and housing combined. Advertisement The study estimates the average Canadian family spent $30,293 on these so-called necessities of life last year, and it works out to about 37.6% of the family’s total cash income.It represents a major family expense flip-flop in the last half century since in 1961, 33.5 percent of the average family income went to pay taxes and 56.5% to basic necessities.The comparison is based on numbers from the Canadian Consumer Tax Index track, of the total tax bill of the average Canadian family, from 1961 to 2015.Including all types of taxes that bill has increased over that period by one thousand 939%, more than two and half times the 706% increase in the Consumer Price Index, and more than 500% higher than any other single expenditure, with shelter next at 1425%.Advertisementlast_img read more

The High-End Holiday With dues that can hit $35,000, luxury travel club thrives despite industry woes

first_imgAt Exclusive Resorts, a deposit of $239,000 plus annual dues of $14,000 gets you 15 vacation days. A $459,000 deposit plus annual dues of $35,000 gets you 45 days. Members who quit the club are refunded 80 percent of their initiation fee. Case’s company operates with a different business model than that of the defunct Tanner and Haley. While Tanner and Haley leased properties, Exclusive Resorts owns the majority of its homes, which it says gives the company sufficient assets to back members’ deposits. In addition, Exclusive Resorts members never own a piece of the properties, as they would in the vacation time-share model. Instead, they are buying into what more closely resembles a country club, Davis said. Jan de Roos, a tourism and real estate professor at Cornell University’s School of Hotel management, said the comparison is valid. “I like the business model,” de Roos said. “You don’t own the real estate. You own the right to use the company’s real estate. Trust is a huge piece of how the business model works ? and I think people trust Steve Case.” Davis said the club’s biggest challenge is managing peak demand, particularly among its ski properties. The sales team is upfront about the club’s limitations. “If you say `I want to go to Vail for Christmas every year,’ we tell you that’s not how it works,” Davis said. To pull demand away from peak times, Exclusive Resorts offers similar properties – such as Deer Valley, Utah – and works hard at offering unique vacation opportunities throughout the year. In the offseason, it offers popular family cooking classes with personal chefs in Tuscany. The club also has a rotating menu of “once-in-a-lifetime” options, like members-only Mediterranean cruises or tours of Buddhist monasteries in Bhutan. The club is expanding its offerings by establishing partnerships with five-star resorts, in which Exclusive Resorts builds its own luxury housing next to a high-end resort hotel. These arrangements give members access to the resort’s spas and other amenities. At Sea Island, Ga., Exclusive Resorts is currently building 24 homes next to The Cloister, a historic resort. On a recent trip, Davis looked over blueprints for the location – now just a dusty construction site – while discussing plans to seamlessly blend the homes in with the existing resort by emulating the Spanish Mediterranean architecture. “Each home is going to look like a little mini Cloister,” Davis said. Catherine Klein, a spokeswoman for Sea Island Resorts, said the partnership makes sense because it brings in a new set of wealthy travelers who otherwise might never have set foot on Sea Island. “It’s a way to bring in their members and expose them to The Cloister,” she said. Every Exclusive Resorts home is outfitted with the same home entertainment systems and the same remote control, so members always know how it works. The homes’ architectural features are tweaked to fit with local flavor. And resort locations are almost always four-bedroom homes with open floor plans to facilitate large family gatherings. Dale Sorensen, 67, of Vero Beach, Fla., joined the club two years ago and said it is ideal for people who like to travel with extended families and travel to new places. “Virtually all of the destinations, except the ones in the big cities, are four- and five-bedroom homes, which makes for a nice family vacation,” said Sorensen, who owns his own real estate business and looked closely at the club’s financial statements before joining. He said travel at peak times like Christmas can require some advance planning, but since he owns his own business he has more flexibility in when he travels. The dues, he said, are a relative bargain compared with what he had been spending on vacation home rentals or multiple rooms at luxury hotels. Jamie Cheng, editor of the Helium Report, which provides research and analysis on destination clubs and other luxury products, said the bankruptcy of industry player Tanner and Haley does not appear to have slowed the luxury travel club business. But he said consumers are asking thorough questions and doing research before choosing a club. “People are looking for the clubs that are fiscally responsible,” he said. Many of Tanner and Haley’s old customers are now members of Ultimate Resort, the second largest destination club, said Ultimate Resort CEO Jim Tousignant. Ultimate Resort, based in Orlando, Fla., purchased Tanner and Haley’s real estate portfolio in bankruptcy, and allowed members to join Ultimate Resort without paying a membership deposit. Tousignant said the majority of former Tanner and Haley customers are now dues-paying Ultimate Resort members, including many who have upgraded their memberships. Last month, Ultimate Resort announced plans to merge with another club, Private Escapes, giving the combined entity 1,200 members. Both Exclusive Resorts and Ultimate Resort say the opportunities for growth are tremendous. Three million Americans are worth $5 million or more, the target demographic for Exclusive Resorts. And with 10 million Americans worth more than $2 million, Davis said he can envision a scaled-down version of the club that would cater to that demographic. For now, Exclusive Resorts focuses near the high end, while Ultimate Resort offers a variety of options. The average home in Exclusive Resorts’ portfolio is worth about $3 million, compared with the $1 million or $2 million homes that might be offered by lower-end clubs. “I really think this concept will change the way we take vacations,” said Davis. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! By Matthew Barakat THE ASSOCIATED PRESS MIAMI – Why are thousands of millionaires queueing up for the right to plunk down up to $459,000, plus annual dues of up to $35,000, just for a few weeks of access to vacation homes? The answers might be found in the 6,000-square-foot villas in Tuscany with infinity pools overlooking the countryside, the Miami Beach oceanfront condos with balconies overlooking the Atlantic and Intracoastal Waterway, and the private chefs whipping up gourmet dinners. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.Exclusive Resorts, a venture led by AOL co-founder Steve Case, is the largest player in a growing segment of the travel industry that a few years ago was essentially nonexistent – the luxury destination club. The clubs have not been without problems: The first, Tanner and Haley, filed for bankruptcy last year, leaving hundreds of members fighting in bankruptcy court to try to reclaim some portion of their membership deposits. Despite the recent tumult, Denver-based Exclusive Resorts has grown 50 percent in the past 12 months, from 2,000 to 3,000 members, said company Chairman Donn Davis, a longtime associate of Case from their days at AOL. The club has a waiting list of more than 100. “Our members are some of the wealthiest, most discerning consumers out there,” Davis said. “They’ve done their homework on us” and decided the investment is worth it, he said. It works like this: A member pays an initiation fee of several hundred thousand dollars, plus annual dues in a range of $15,000 to $35,000 a year. In return, the member gets access to the club’s roster of more than 300 properties in 34 destinations around the world. last_img

Mubarak’s remarks anger Shiites

first_imgCAIRO, Egypt – Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak angered Iraqi leaders Sunday by saying Shiites there and across the Middle East are more loyal to Iran than to their own countries as he gave a startlingly frank warning about possible civil war in Iraq. The flap highlights the escalating tensions between predominantly Sunni Arab countries – alarmed by possible Kurdish and Shiite domination of their neighbor – and Iraqis who say they are not getting enough support from their Arab brothers. “Definitely Iran has influence on Shiites,” Mubarak said in an interview broadcast Saturday evening by Al-Arabiya television. “Shiites are 65 percent of the Iraqis … Most of the Shiites are loyal to Iran, and not to the countries they are living in.” He also said civil war “has almost started” in Iraq. So the interview startled not only Iraqis but also the Shiites who form large communities in a number of Mideast nations – particularly the Gulf, Saudi Arabia and Lebanon. Some of them said Mubarak’s comments only fuel momentum toward civil war. Mubarak’s spokesman, Suleiman Awad, tried Sunday to soften the impact. He said the president was talking about Shiite sympathy with Iran “in view of its hosting of (Shiite) holy shrines.” “The president’s statement about Iraq was only reflecting his increasing worries about the deteriorating situation and his keenness to maintain Iraq’s national unity,” Awad said. That did not seem to mollify Iraqi leaders. “This is a stab in their (Shiites’) patriotism and their civilization,” Iraq’s three highest-ranking Kurdish, Shiite and Sunni Arab leaders – Talabani, Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari and parliament speaker Adnan Pachachi – said in a joint statement Sunday.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event“At the moment, Iraq is almost close to destruction,” he warned. Iraqi President Jalal Talabani, a Kurd, said Mubarak’s comments were not accurate. “It is true that there are some kind of clashes among Sunnis and Shias. But it is not civil war,” he told Britain’s Channel 4 News. British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw reiterated that civil war in Iraq was neither imminent nor inevitable but accepted that the situation was “very serious.” Mubarak has rarely commented on the situation in Iraq and his statements usually are broad, vague expressions of concern over the violence and political turmoil there. Arab leaders also generally avoid pointed criticism of their fellow leaders. last_img read more

Sunshine merger backed

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2“As far as I’m concerned, it’s one more time they’ve shafted the community,” said Wayde Hunter, president of the North Valley Coalition, which has opposed the deal and advocates closing the landfill much earlier. “It’s pretty typical of the Board of Supervisors. They have no compassion for anybody.” Jan Chatten-Brown, an attorney who represents the North Valley Coalition, the Teamsters Union and state and national environmental groups, noted that BFI could dump as much as 147 million tons of trash at the site – far more than the 90 million tons approved in the early 1990s – unless a cap is imposed. “That is far in excess of what was represented to the community when this was previously approved,” Chatten-Brown said. Greg Loughnane, BFI’s district manager, said the 147-million-ton figure is merely an estimate and that the landfill has always had approval to reach a certain elevation, not a maximum tonnage. The San Fernando Valley is on track to become home to one of the nation’s largest garbage dumps after Los Angeles County supervisors voted Tuesday to merge two Sunshine Canyon Landfill sites into a 1,528-acre megadump. The board’s 3-2 vote allows Browning-Ferris Industries to run its side-by-side dumps – one in the unincorporated county, the other in Granada Hills – as a single operation until 2036. Supervisors Michael D. Antonovich and Zev Yaroslavsky, who both represent the Valley, cast the dissenting votes. Under the controversial deal, the county will receive $65 million in fees to pay for environmental and recycling programs and to address traffic concerns. More stringent environmental, monitoring and reporting conditions also will be imposed. But the plan – which now heads to the City Council for approval – drew outraged protests from longtime critics, who decried the lack of a cap on capacity and the length of the operating contract. BFI had argued that merging the sites would help it run the landfill more efficiently with a single set of equipment and governing rules and a single daily disposal area. “We are pleased that they saw things the way we did in creating a positive – not only in terms of a more efficient landfill, but a positive for the community in terms of the benefits described, including $60 million for the community and environmental programs,” Loughnane said. Chatten-Brown did praise some of the provisions imposed – including more stringent environmental conditions and alternative fuel vehicles – as “major, major victories that frankly would never have happened if there hadn’t been broad coalition support.” Although city and county officials have long anticipated that the two landfills would be merged, the county Planning Commission in November rejected the plan. Members cited concerns about traffic from trash trucks, the shortage of recycling facilities and the lack of a guaranteed closure date. BFI appealed to the supervisors. At the time, Granada Hills activists said the plan would eliminate some of the strict requirements imposed by the city, and they wanted a guarantee that the landfill would close in 2016 and that a long-term insurance plan be put in place in case the landfill leaks in the future. In a letter read to the supervisors, U.S. Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Sherman Oaks, noted that the landfill is located near the California Aqueduct, which supplies most of the water in Southern California, and two major earthquake faults. “The possibility of a landfill failure is very real and will have disastrous public health consequences,” Sherman wrote. “In the San Fernando Valley, cleanup costs could easily exceed $100 million.” Sherman said insurance should be maintained on the landfill beyond 30 years and he’s requested the U.S. Government Accountability Office to determine the risk taxpayers could face if a large earthquake were to rupture the landfill’s liners, polluting Southern California’s water supply. Residents near the landfill have long complained about leaky liners and blowing trash. Some believe they have contracted cancer and respiratory ailments from pollutants in the air and water. In a letter read to the supervisors, North Valley Coalition member Mary Edwards wrote that she has fought the expansion of the landfill for decades, but has contracted bone cancer. “I naively thought that no one would site a giant landfill next to the largest water supply in the United States,” Edwards wrote. “I never believed a corporation could influence those I believed were thoughtful elected officials who would never approve such a project. “I soon found out the bottom line of the corporation and that it would be aggressively pursued at the expense of our community.” Hunter, president of the coalition, said merging the dumps raises other safety concerns. “The county liner is leaking,” Hunter said. “That bridge area was the one way to detect that leakage. Now they will cover it up with trash, so finally all of any leakage coming down will end up in the city first.” County sources said they believed the three other supervisors voted for the plan because they have landfills in their own districts and recognize the need for more landfill space in the county and the potential expense of various other options under consideration. But Antonovich said Valley residents have been promised in the past that the landfill will eventually close and other options will be sought to deal with the region’s trash. “They are justifiably alarmed over the high levels of cancer rates some neighborhoods have had,” Antonovich said. “Furthermore, they are quite frustrated over the false assurances given from time to time over the last 48 years. Having some time frame for its closure is important.” troy.anderson@dailynews.com (213) 974-8985160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Desert makes most of opportunity

first_imgEDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE – Desert High is playing with house money, and the Scorpions aren’t completely comfortable with the way they got it. Nevertheless, they are determined to play for all it is worth. After finishing fourth in High Desert League play, Desert claimed a Southern Section Div. XII playoff at-large berth on the recommendation of third-place Mojave, which withdrew from playoffs after threats of gang violence forced the cancellation of a Nov. 4 league game against Frazier Mountain of Lebec and a subsequent arson incident at the school gym. The Scorpions (4-7), in the playoffs for the first time since playing in the 2002 Div. XII championship game, defeated Lucerne Valley 12-3 in a first-round playoff game Friday. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Desert coach Chris Hinton said his players feel bad for regional rival Mojave, which defeated his team 28-14 in a regular-season finale to clinch an apparent playoff berth. “It’s not a matter of how they got in, it’s what they do when they’re there that matters and that’s what we’re focusing on,” Hinton said. “It’s unfortunate for Mojave, but our kids are excited about the opportunity.” Hinton said that excitement showed in the Lucerne Valley game. “They could have taken this as a vacation, but we got in and played really hard,” Hinton said. Familiar foe: Desert plays host to Ontario Christian (9-2) in Friday’s quarterfinal in a rematch of the 2002 championship game, which Ontario Christian won 27-19. Desert quarterback/defensive back Ryan Gava was a freshman on the 2002 team and appeared briefly in the title game at receiver. His older brother, Nick Gava, was the Scorpions’ starting quarterback. The 2002 title game was a blue-chip prospect showcase featuring Desert receiver Rudy Burgess and Ontario Christian running back Drew Robinson, who went to Arizona State and Nevada-Reno, respectively. “We don’t have the star power we did then, and neither do they,” said Hinton, who was Desert’s defensive coordinator that year. “It’s a team effort for us as it is for them.” Pass-happy: Rosamond (9-2), which defeated Desert Christian 35-0 Friday to advance to the quarterfinals, plays host to an L.A. Baptist of North Hills (6-3-1) team on Friday that passes more than anyone the Roadrunners have seen. The Knights threw the ball on 36 percent of their 476 offensive plays and gained nearly half of their yards (1,200 of 2,431) via the pass. It is an entirely different look than the Roadrunners are accustomed to in the High Desert, where passing teams are scarce. “It is a concern because we’re not used to it,” Rosamond coach Kevin Rizer said. Rizer said he’s working with defensive backs and linebacker on “playing honest” in practices this week, trying to get them to read the plays before filling holes against the run. Vulnerability? Vasquez coach Doug Odum acknowledged Friday’s Div. XII quarterfinal against No. 1 seeded Aquinas of San Bernardino (10-1) is a formidable challenge. But he believes Aquinas’ vulnerability to the pass, something he saw in watching film of its 34-0 first-round victory over Kern Valley of Lake Isabella is something the Mustangs might be able to exploit. Vasquez plays host to Aquinas on Friday at 7:30. “We saw Kern Valley throw on them and they threw rather well, so we plan to do same thing,” Odum said. Vasquez rallied from an early 13-point deficit in Friday’s first-round 21-13 victory over Salesian Los Angeles. The Mustangs, who didn’t run an offensive play in the first quarter, held their opponent without a first down in the second half. Vasquez quarterback Joe Perez, who sat out the Mustangs’ regular-season finale (a 17-7 loss to Rio Hondo of Arcadia) due to a suspension, was instrumental in leading the comeback. “It was like night and day,” Odum said of having Perez back. Gideon Rubin, (818)713-3607 gideon.rubin@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Montgomery holds strong down the stretch, beats Arcata to win 2016 AIBT title

first_imgArcata >> For nearly the entirety of Saturday night’s game, the message from the Montgomery bench to its players as the Vikings headed back on defense was as simple as three little words.“Get a stop.”The Vikings’ coaches asked, and the players sure did deliver — especially down the stretch.Montgomery held Arcata to just two field goals in the final six-plus minutes to finally pull away for good and claim a 49-39 win over the hometown Tigers in the championship game of the 49th annual Jerry …last_img

Montas shines as A’s win 6th straight

first_imgCLEVELAND >> The 2019 A’s are beginning to look like the 2018 A’s, Part 2.“Obviously, you’re not going to win every game, but this is the type of baseball that we expect to play,” catcher Nick Hundley said after going 3 for 4 with a home run and double in the A’s sixth straight win, 7-2 over the Indians on Wednesday.“This is what we envisioned at the start of the season. It wasn’t what we were doing at the start of the season, but that doesn’t matter now. This is the team that we envisioned …last_img