History professor’s research provides insight into the COVID-19 crisis

first_imgThe COVID-19 pandemic has brought many issues to light in the media that otherwise lay hidden beneath the surface of current events. Leaders in business, education and other industries have turned to the work of historians to better respond to the effects of the coronavirus. Department of history professor Joshua Specht researched the history of environmental and economic impacts of the beef industry in the United States. Specht said his historical research has become more relevant with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on meat packing facilities and production work today, as the CDC reported 16,233 known cases in 239 meat and poultry processing facilities among 23 states as of July 10.Specht explained how meatpacking facilities are designed and how this has impacted the spread of COVID-19. “One of the main ways that we get basically affordable meat in large quantities is by designing slaughterhouses for maximum efficiency in terms of output,” Specht said. “If you imagine a factory that’s just making screws or something, everything is the same size and it makes it very easy to use machines. But in a slaughterhouse, you’re much more reliant on people, so there’s a lot less mechanization.” Specht said this layout means employees in meat processing facilities work in tight conditions that make them prone to the spread of COVID-19. “What I saw is that the [conditions] that provide cheap meat for us also make slaughterhouses centers of coronavirus risk,” he said.He also spoke to a number of workers in these meatpacking facilities in doing research. “Often, the employees in the meatpacking facilities are from so-called vulnerable groups, recent immigrants who might not have a good command of public resources and refugees,” he said.Specht said these groups are likely to continue working in extenuating circumstances like a pandemic because they are afraid to advocate for their rights. The application of Specht’s research to working conditions in meatpacking facilities during the coronavirus pandemic has led him to new topics to look into for his research.“My research has made me particularly interested in a place of agriculture in American history and also American politics,” Specht said. “The pandemic and situations with workers and risks of workers have definitely been something that I’m getting more and more interested in from a research perspective and want to keep in mind.”He said the dynamics of communities, particularly during the pandemic, also fascinate him from a research perspective. At this time, Specht does not have any undergraduate research assistants, yet he said he is looking forward to working with student research assistants in the future. In the future, he will teach a history of food class, along with a class on the history of the American West.Specht encouraged Notre Dame campus community members to remember that some of the people who are most vulnerable are staff members and employees. “To the extent that we’re all in it together –– the students, the faculty, the administration –– that’s also to protect people in the community and employees,” Specht said. Tags: COVID-19, Joshua Specht, meat packinglast_img read more

Dean John-Wilson & Jade Ewen Will Star in London’s Aladdin

first_img View Comments The rumors were true and it’s been confirmed that West End alum Dean John-Wilson and former Sugababes singer Jade Ewen will star in London’s Aladdin as the titular character and Princess Jasmine, respectively. They are set to join the previously announced Trevor Dion Nicholas as the genie in the production, which is scheduled to begin performances on May 27, 2016. The opening night has been pushed back to June 15 (from June 9) at the Prince Edward Theatre, which currently plays host to the Broadway-bound Miss Saigon.Wilson was most recently seen in the U.K. National Theatre’s production of off-Broadway smash hit Here Lies Love; additional stage credits include From Here to Eternity. Ewen is best known for her work with British pop group the Sugababes; a former protege of Andrew Lloyd Webber, she is currently appearing in the London production of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s In the Heights.Adapted from the 1992 Disney animated film, Aladdin is the story of a street urchin who uses the help of a magic Genie to win the heart of Princess Jasmine. Directed and choreographed by Casey Nicholaw, the production features a book by Chad Beguelin, music by Alan Menken and lyrics by Beguelin, Tim Rice and the late Howard Ashman.The London company will also include Don Gallagher as Jafar, Peter Howe as Iago, Irvine Iqbal as the Sultan, Nathan Amzi as Babkak, Stephen Rahman-Hughes as Kassim and Rachid Sabitri as Omar, along with Arran Anzani-Jones, Miles Barrow, Albey Brookes, Lauren Chia, Bianca Cordice, Leon Craig, Daniel de Bourg, Seng Henk Goh, Melanie Elizabeth, Kade Ferraiolo, Michelle Chantelle Hopewell, Fred Johanson, Mitch Leow, Oliver Lidert, Thierry Picaut, Alex Pinder, Briony Scarlett, Kyle Seeley, Sadie-Jean Shirley, Ricardo Spriggs, Katie Singh, Dawnita Smith, Marsha Songcome, Kayleigh Thadani and Jermaine Woods.Aladdin continues to run on Broadway at the New Amsterdam Theatre. The production officially opened on March 20, 2014, starring Adam Jacobs as Aladdin, Courtney Reed as Jasmine, James Monroe Iglehart as the Genie and Jonathan Freeman as Jafar.last_img read more

Peru Armed Forces Celebrate Military Valor Day by Recalling Operation Chavín de Huantar

first_imgBoth Col. Juan Valer Sandoval and Capt. Raúl Jiménez Chávez, who were killed during the operation, were promoted posthumously to those ranks, and are regarded as heroes in Peru. The Military rescued all of the hostages except for one: Carlos Giusti Acuña, a member of the Supreme Court, who died. Training for a bold operation Intelligence and spy efforts were key reasons for the success of the operation, said retired Army General Leonel Cabrera, who was in charge of one of the assault teams that freed the hostages. Intelligence and spy efforts were key reasons for the success of the operation, said retired Army General Leonel Cabrera, who was in charge of one of the assault teams that freed the hostages. That incident began on December 17, 1996, when 14 MRTA terrorists, led by Néstor Cerpa Cartolini, held hostage hundreds of people attending a birthday party for Emperor Akihito at the embassy. “After the explosions, the Commandos appeared and proceeded to place their small explosives in the walls along the perimeter, the explosives went off, opening a gap, and all the Commandos were able to enter the residence,” Gen. Zapata said. Military Victory Day, which takes place every April 22nd, is an homage to the 1997 Armed Forces effort that led to the rescue of 72 captives from the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement, which had held them for 126 days in the Japanese ambassador’s residence. The heroic mission is a lesson to the entire world, said Army General César Astudillo, because “140 service members of Peru’s Armed Forces put the performance of their duty before any other responsibility.” “Using these organizations, we put together the intervention force building on groups for command, assault, support, security and sharpshooters,” said Gen. Zapata. The success of the operation relied on secrecy, surprise, and speed. Microphones are hidden in pillows The Military rescued all of the hostages except for one: Carlos Giusti Acuña, a member of the Supreme Court, who died. “We inserted microphones into the produce and pillows for the hostages. We put together a psychological profile of the captors and we learned their routines,” said retired Army General Leonel Cabrera. “We knew what time they played soccer in the hall. That was their mistake: That was the time we could enter and surprise them.” Commandos get the order to raid home Their rescue required a great amount of Military preparation. Their rescue required a great amount of Military preparation. Army Commander Lieutenant Colonel Luis Marca Silva was the first to enter. He recalled his mission clearly: “We had to blow up the main door, enter the second floor, and rescue the hostages who were in the rooms along the front of the building…At the time, I didn’t even think about running into a terrorist and having a shoot-out with him. We had trained for everything in this operation and everything was ready.” The personnel selected for this operation, he recalled, included the best Commandos teamed together in groups. The best shooters were assigned to sharpshooting, the best explosive handlers managed that task, and those best-suited to enter the residence made up another group. “All of them were part of the intervention force.” Peru recently celebrated what is widely regarded as one of the most successful military operations in the country’s history. Armed with AKM rifles, RPG launchers, explosives and dynamite, they took captive diplomats, government and Military officials, and business executives, demanding from the government millions of dollars and the release of imprisoned group members. MRTA had begun its criminal activities in 1984 with targeted killings of police officers, Military service members and civilians, car bomb attacks, and kidnappings. On this occasion they gradually released most of the hostages, but detained 72 for more than four months. To carry out the mission, the Military rented housing around the residence to observe what was going on, while simultaneously, a replica of the home was built for use in training the service members to execute the rescue in the shortest time possible. Both Col. Juan Valer Sandoval and Capt. Raúl Jiménez Chávez, who were killed during the operation, were promoted posthumously to those ranks, and are regarded as heroes in Peru. Military Victory Day, which takes place every April 22nd, is an homage to the 1997 Armed Forces effort that led to the rescue of 72 captives from the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement, which had held them for 126 days in the Japanese ambassador’s residence. The heroic mission is a lesson to the entire world, said Army General César Astudillo, because “140 service members of Peru’s Armed Forces put the performance of their duty before any other responsibility.” By Dialogo June 03, 2015 “After the explosions, the Commandos appeared and proceeded to place their small explosives in the walls along the perimeter, the explosives went off, opening a gap, and all the Commandos were able to enter the residence,” Gen. Zapata said. The Commandos learned they would put their preparation and re-training to use on April 27, 1997, when Gen. Zapata received the order to raid the residence from then-president Alberto Fujimori. The following day, during the operation, Soldiers detonated explosive charges under the residence floors in tunnels that had been constructed over several months by a group of miners, allowing the Military to use the element of surprise for the operation. Operation Chavín de Huántar was named in reference to a Peruvian archaeological site famous for its underground passageways. Astudillo, a participant in the mission who is now chief of the VRAEM Special Command, recalled his comrades-in-arms who died in the effort. Army Colonel Juan Valer Sandoval and Captain Raúl Jiménez Chávez lost their lives, he said, but set an example in patriotism that can be summed up in one phrase: “We did it for Peru.” Training for a bold operation The Commandos learned they would put their preparation and re-training to use on April 27, 1997, when Gen. Zapata received the order to raid the residence from then-president Alberto Fujimori. The following day, during the operation, Soldiers detonated explosive charges under the residence floors in tunnels that had been constructed over several months by a group of miners, allowing the Military to use the element of surprise for the operation. Operation Chavín de Huántar was named in reference to a Peruvian archaeological site famous for its underground passageways. That incident began on December 17, 1996, when 14 MRTA terrorists, led by Néstor Cerpa Cartolini, held hostage hundreds of people attending a birthday party for Emperor Akihito at the embassy. “Using these organizations, we put together the intervention force building on groups for command, assault, support, security and sharpshooters,” said Gen. Zapata. The success of the operation relied on secrecy, surprise, and speed. “The operation needed to take place in the space of four minutes, but in real life it took over 40,” Gen. Cabrera said. “On the second floor, a group of terrorists had set up a defense from one of the rooms with explosives and they responded to our military incursion.” “Re-training was the key to success in the Chavín de Huántar Military operation,” said retired General José Williams Zapata, the officer in charge of the intervention. “What we did was re-train ourselves; we had all received training already. More than anything else, it was done to develop good teamwork. We are not talking about first-time training, but about specialized Troops who must train to take action depending on the scenario.” Peru recently celebrated what is widely regarded as one of the most successful military operations in the country’s history. To carry out the mission, the Military rented housing around the residence to observe what was going on, while simultaneously, a replica of the home was built for use in training the service members to execute the rescue in the shortest time possible. Army Commander Lieutenant Colonel Luis Marca Silva was the first to enter. He recalled his mission clearly: “We had to blow up the main door, enter the second floor, and rescue the hostages who were in the rooms along the front of the building…At the time, I didn’t even think about running into a terrorist and having a shoot-out with him. We had trained for everything in this operation and everything was ready.” “Re-training was the key to success in the Chavín de Huántar Military operation,” said retired General José Williams Zapata, the officer in charge of the intervention. “What we did was re-train ourselves; we had all received training already. More than anything else, it was done to develop good teamwork. We are not talking about first-time training, but about specialized Troops who must train to take action depending on the scenario.” Armed with AKM rifles, RPG launchers, explosives and dynamite, they took captive diplomats, government and Military officials, and business executives, demanding from the government millions of dollars and the release of imprisoned group members. MRTA had begun its criminal activities in 1984 with targeted killings of police officers, Military service members and civilians, car bomb attacks, and kidnappings. On this occasion they gradually released most of the hostages, but detained 72 for more than four months. Commandos get the order to raid home Microphones are hidden in pillows Military authorities chose about 140 service members for the mission, including both Officers and NCOs, from the Special Forces Brigade and the Army Commando School, joined by Navy Officers. “We inserted microphones into the produce and pillows for the hostages. We put together a psychological profile of the captors and we learned their routines,” said retired Army General Leonel Cabrera. “We knew what time they played soccer in the hall. That was their mistake: That was the time we could enter and surprise them.” Military authorities chose about 140 service members for the mission, including both Officers and NCOs, from the Special Forces Brigade and the Army Commando School, joined by Navy Officers. Astudillo, a participant in the mission who is now chief of the VRAEM Special Command, recalled his comrades-in-arms who died in the effort. Army Colonel Juan Valer Sandoval and Captain Raúl Jiménez Chávez lost their lives, he said, but set an example in patriotism that can be summed up in one phrase: “We did it for Peru.” The personnel selected for this operation, he recalled, included the best Commandos teamed together in groups. The best shooters were assigned to sharpshooting, the best explosive handlers managed that task, and those best-suited to enter the residence made up another group. “All of them were part of the intervention force.” “The operation needed to take place in the space of four minutes, but in real life it took over 40,” Gen. Cabrera said. “On the second floor, a group of terrorists had set up a defense from one of the rooms with explosives and they responded to our military incursion.” last_img read more

Women’s Soccer: Badgers upset No. 8 Gophers in overtime shutout

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin women’s soccer team continued Big Ten conference play Saturday and knocked off No. 8 Minnesota Golden Gophers 1-0 on the road. Going into Saturday’s game, the Badgers owned a record of 1-2-1 in the Big Ten and were coming off a 3-2 loss to the Indiana Hoosiers. In a defensive shutout that went into overtime, the Badgers finally broke the tie behind a goal from freshman forward Dani Rhodes and pulled off the upset over the Gophers (9-3-1, 3-1-1 Big Ten).Wisconsin (5-4-4, 2-2-1 Big Ten) continued their dominance on defense but struggled to find the net. Goalkeeper Caitlyn Clem played an excellent game for the Badgers, recording three diving saves that secured the victory. The physical battle was one that saw 31 total fouls between both teams and proved to be another classic in an already historic rivalry.Women’s Soccer: Freshman forward Dani Rhodes defies first-year hurdles for WisconsinAt this time last year, Dani Rhodes was setting records in both soccer and basketball for Waukesha West High School. Read…The Badgers created scoring chances for themselves early in the first half. Midfielders Rose Lavelle and Micaela Powers, along with defender Camryn Biegalski, were all able to rattle off a few shots but were unable to find the back of the net in regulation. Lavelle led the team with three shots followed by forward Emily Borgmann with two. The second half was just as dry as each offense took only a few opportunities — Wisconsin shooting four times and Minnesota tallying five. The game remained scoreless until the 99th minute when Rhodes found the back of the net inside the six yard box. The goal was Rhodes’ second of the year with her first goal coming in the season opener against Illinois State just minutes into the game, which also proved to be the game-winner. The victory improved Wisconsin to .500 in conference play which currently puts them in seventh in the Big Ten standings. A win like this against an eighth-ranked conference opponent could give the Badgers the spark they need to contend for a consecutive Big Ten regular season championship. Despite struggling offensively for the better half of the season, the Badgers have still outscored their opponents 15-12. This is good news for a team who constantly creates chances offensively and is complimented by a defense that has recorded five shutouts and allowed multiple goals in a single game only three times. In their next match, Wisconsin will be back home in the McClimon Soccer Complex to take on another difficult opponent in the Nebraska Cornhuskers (9-4-0, 3-2-0 Big Ten) Oct. 6. The Badgers have won the last two meetings against the Cornhuskers with their last defeat against them coming in 2013. The game will start at 7 p.m. and can be viewed on BTN.last_img read more

Buffon wins Italy’s best player award

first_img0Shares0000A true workhorse, Gianluigi Buffon has constantly progressed technically and has lost almost none of his extraordinary physical capabilitiesMILAN, Italy, Nov 28 – Italy’s veteran goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon has eased some of his World Cup heartache by winning the Serie A Best Player of the Year award.“I’m happy and proud. I never thought I’d get this kind of trophy, and I’ll hold on tight to it because I never won best youngster!” said the 39-year-old Juventus goalkeeper at Monday night’s ceremony. “The failure to participate in the World is the biggest disappointment in my career together with some (lost) Champions League finals.”Napoli’s Maurizio Sarri was named the best coach in the Italian football awards, voted for by the players, for competing for the title with a smaller budget than Juventus.Buffon quit international football last month as four-time champions Italy sensationally missed out on their first World Cup finals in 60 years after a playoff defeat to Sweden.“Italy-Sweden was the biggest disappointment of my life,” he told Sky Sports Italia.“But we need to move on, the season must end in the best way and with Juventus there are so many goals to be achieved.”Buffon won a tenth Serie A title with Juventus and helped the Turin-based side reach the Champions League final for the second time in three years.He also won a third Italian Cup with the Juve.Despite the World Cup setback, he has left the door open on a future return for the national side.“I’ve taken a period of rest, I’m getting on, I’ve always been a soldier signed up for the national side and Juventus, so I can’t desert,” he said.“Even at the age of 60, if there was a dearth of goalkeepers I’d be available because that’s how I conceive the idea of a nation.”It is the sixth straight year that a Juventus player has won the award with Buffon following in the footsteps of Andrea Pirlo (2012- 014), Carlos Tevez (2015) and Leonardo Bonucci (2016).Buffon has said he will retire at the end of this season, unless Juventus win the Champions League title.The Serie A champions play league leaders Napoli on Friday before a crunch Champions League game next week at Olympiakos when they need a win to guarantee passage into the next round.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more